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Fragment of the review by Grazyna J. Kozaczka Professor of English, Cazenovia College, of Walking on Ice which appeared in the quarterly Polish Review Vol. 57, No.3 (2012), pp. 114-116 published by University of Illinois Press:

 

This dramatic episode serves well as the opening for this interesting novel, especially because it introduces an important theme of the effects a totalitarian system has both on individuals and on their interpersonal relationships.  Czeslaw Milosz, in his Captive Mind addresses the same issue intellectually, while Pilatowicz writes an emotional response from the point of view of a child who feels more than she understands.

 

Maria Pilatowicz, Walking on Ice (Mustang, OK: Tate Publishing & enterprises LLC, 2011) 191pp.         ISBN 978-1-61346-929-3.  See mariapilatowicz.com

Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/polishreview.57.3.0114

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